Provincial issues such as the future of the Ontario Food Terminal continue to simmer over the summeragainst the backdrop of a fall federal election reports Gordon Stock.

L-R:  Charles Stevens, Caleigh Irwin, MP Wayne Easter, Bill George, Gordon Stock.

The last official horticultural lobbying event before the federal election was held on May 7 in Ottawa. Besides a food policy for Canada, crop protection and financial protection for growers, other files are in play.

L-R: Alison Robertson, executive director, OFVGA; Mike Chromczak, OFVGA director, John Vanthoff, deputy leader, NDP Official Opposition; Bill George, chair, OFVGA; Gordon Stock, senior policy advisor, OFVGA.

OFVGA’s first Lobby Day was staged the day before the release of the Ontario budget. Columnist Gordon Stock shares the highlights.

The OFVGA has been active in submitting position statements to the provincial government on a host of issues. Foodland Ontario, the Edible Horticulture Support Program, Risk Management Program, carbon pricing and Ontario Food Terminal are just a few.

Ontario’s Bill 66, Restoring Ontario Competitiveness Act, looks at changes that would allow municipalities to circumvent development rules in the Greenbelt.

Ontario’s Bill 66, Restoring Ontario Competitiveness Act, looks at changes that would allow municipalities to circumvent development rules in the Greenbelt. 

Bill 66 was introduced on December 6, 2018 and represents amendments to acts involving a dozen ministries, and is intended to increase the competitiveness of doing business in Ontario. 

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