BASF launches insecticide Sefina

On January 17, BASF released Sefina to provide Canadian potato farmers with a new pest management option for aphid control. The active ingredient Inscalis, a Group 9D, is able to provide up to three weeks of protection from aphids and acts as an additional active ingredient for farmers to mediate pest resistance. 

 

For more information please contact BASF customer care number 1-877-371-BASF, click here to visit the website or here to watch a quick video on how Sefina works.

Source BASF January 17, 2019 news release 

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Publish date: 
Wednesday, January 23, 2019

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