BASF moves into insecticides

 

BASF is not thought of as an insecticide company, but that’s about to change with its expected 2019 launch of Sefina for the control of piercing and sucking insects in potatoes. The active ingredient, Inscalis, will also appear in a product to be called Versys for other fruits and vegetables. 

 

“This product will rapidly stop aphid feeding and give extended control for two to three weeks,” explained Scott Hodgins, crop manager, horticulture, BASF Canada. He was speaking at the company’s Knowledge Harvest event in London, Ontario on February 1.  

 

“This is a new chemical class and unique mode of action with no cross-resistance to existing chemistry,” he continued. 

 

Inscalis, the new active ingredient is from the pyropene chemistry class (group 9D). It works by disorienting the insect, which then dehydrates and starves. It is effective against aphids and whiteflies. 

 

The product is safe for pollinators and beneficial insects, a key environmental consideration. Sefina and Versys will be compatible in integrated pest management programs. To date, tank mix partners have not been announced. 

 

The dossier was submitted for registration to both American and Canadian regulatory authorities in April 2016. For the 2018 season, BASF Canada has applied for research authorization trials for Sefina in potatoes and soybeans and for Versys in pome and stone fruit in anticipation of formal launch in 2019. 

 

BASF has applied for registrations in CG 4-13 leafy vegetables, CG 5-13 Brassica head and stem vegetables, CG 8-09 fruiting vegetables, CG 9 cucurbit vegetables, CG 11-09 pome fruits, CG 12-09 stone fruits, CSG 22B leaf petioles vegetables and tree nuts. 

For a YouTube video, click here.

 

 

Publish date: 
Friday, February 2, 2018

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