China accepting U.S. fruit

The fractious relationship between China and the U.S. has caught fruit shipments in the crossfire.  In the last month, the China Inspection and Quarantine (CIQ) agency has been detaining all American fruit shipments for seven days upon arrival in China for the purpose of testing for pesticide residues. As of May 23, inspections in Beijing and Shanghai were being released the same day.

 

This is critical news for California cherry growers who are now in peak season. The timing is encouraging for Washington state growers who will start shipping cherries in the first week of June. Cherries represent about half of the $226 million (US dollars) of fruit exports to China.

 

U.S. fruit exports have faced headwinds with China introducing a 15 per cent tariff on April 2, 2018.

 

Source:  FreshPlaza.com

If latest news: 
Check if it is latest news (for "Latest News" page)
Publish date: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018

Click to leave a comment

CAPTCHA
For security purposes, please confirm you are not a robot!

RELATED NEWS

Maersk Line to Montreal

Maersk Line, the world's largest shipping company, is expanding its product portfolio between Europe's Mediterranean region and Canada. The first sailing arrives in Montreal on July 19. 

Romaine lettuce story not over

The harvest season for romaine lettuce ended April 16 in Yuma, Arizona, but contamination with E. coli has caused five deaths and 197 illnesses. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports, the toll equals the spinach tragedy of 2006. 

New Brunswick potato seeding underway

The historic floods of the Saint John River have been devastating in southern reaches of New Brunswick – Fredericton and Moncton -- but have had no effect on potato growers at higher elevations. 

China intensifies inspections

Tensions are growing between China and the U.S. as increased inspections of fruit have on-the-ground implications. A U.S. Apple representative explains the ripple effects. 

Update: E. coli outbreak in romaine lettuce

One death in California has been attributed to the E.coli outbreak in romaine lettuce, traced to a farm in Yuma, Arizona. As of May 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predict more reports of sickness.