Drones for crop protection

Drones can be programmed for group flights.
The field equipment showroom of the future could look like this, courtesy of Chinese company Eagle Brother Co Ltd

Eagle Brother Co Ltd, a Chinese company based in Hubei province, is launching a platform for spraying crops with drones. Farmers will provide information on varieties and types of crops, the size of the farm and the necessary pesticides to be used. Drones will apply the sprays. 

 

Each drone can carry a payload of 10 to 30 kilograms of crop protection material. Systems have been created for group flying for large acreages. 

 

As recently as 2016, the company cooperated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Artificial Intelligent Experts of Autostereoscopic 3D for UAV full automatic intelligent control technology. The company’s founder, Li Caisheng, has been honoured as a leading entrepreneur in China.

 

At a launch event in Vietnam, the company demonstrated multi-rotors and helicopters as well as a model drone which had sprayed 40 acres of rice paddies in two hours with only one quadcopter and 12 batteries.

 

To view a video, go to this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lElsFDIvPH0

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Publish date: 
Thursday, August 30, 2018

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