New Brunswick potato seeding underway

The TV images of record flooding in New Brunswick are distressing, but the good news is that potato growers have not been affected.

 

“We have no issues of flooding,” says Matt Hemphill, executive director, Potatoes New Brunswick. “We’re planting potatoes as we speak.” 

 

About 50,000 acres of potatoes will be seeded this year, up slightly with demand for another 4,000 acres from the expanded McCain Foods plant in Florenceville-Bristol. The $65 million, state-of-the-art plant opened October 2017 with a specialty product line.  Interest from processors in Prince Edward Island and Quebec is also buoying planting intentions. 

 

On May 14, New Brunswick growers will be voting on a processing contract with McCain Foods and Old Dutch Foods.   

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Publish date: 
Friday, May 11, 2018

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