Produce shipments slowing at U.S.-Mexico border

Shipments of fresh produce from Mexico into the U.S. are likely to be impacted by the U.S. reassignment of up to 750 border guards to assist in processing migrant crossings along the southern border.

 

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) commissioner Kevin McAleenan made the announcement March 27, 2019, saying that importers and exporters should expect to see “a slowdown in the processing of trade.” CBP will be forced to close some processing lanes, potentially in the ports of El Paso, Laredo, Tucson and San Diego. Officials at Nogales, Arizona have also announced a closure of commercial border traffic on Sundays.

 

The United Fresh Produce Association says that these steps will cause significant harm to growers, wholesale distributors, transportation companies, grocery stores, restaurants and most importantly, American consumers. On behalf of the fresh produce industry and the broad cross-section of members, the association urges political leaders to reconsider these steps that would profoundly interrupt the ability to bring fresh, healthy produce to all Americans. If these actions are implemented, millions of dollars in economic losses can be expected while increasing costs to consumers across North America. 

 

Fresh fruit and vegetables are the most perishable and sensitive to timely inspection and delivery of any farm products.  Disruptions of weeks, days or even hours cut supply chains meaning lost wages and lost revenues.  Already, inspection delays are being felt from El Paso to San Diego costing farmers, truck drivers and companies of all sizes. In fact, the San Diego Association of Governments and California Department of Transportation have indicated that even an extra 15 minutes of wait time could cause as much as $1 billion in lost productivity and 134,000 lost in jobs annually.

 

United Fresh says the solution to the immigration problems is not closing the border or slowing commercial traffic, but for Congress and the Administration to work together on real immigration reform.  The association urges the nation’s leaders to move forward with sensible reform that ensures a legal workforce for agriculture together with a functional border. 

 

Source: United Fresh Produce Association April 1, 2019 media statement

If latest news: 
Check if it is latest news (for "Latest News" page)
Publish date: 
Saturday, April 6, 2019

Click to leave a comment

CAPTCHA
For security purposes, please confirm you are not a robot!

RELATED NEWS

EarthFresh Farms expands into southeast U.S.

EarthFresh Farms of Burlington, Ont. announced its expansion into the southeastern U.S. with an advanced technological packing plant and distribution centre in Atlanta, Georgia.

The new 140,000 sq. ft. facilities will operate as EarthFresh Atlanta.

Update on U.S – China trade talks

President Donald Trump says he’s asked China to immediately remove all tariffs on U.S. agricultural products, according to Bloomberg news service. That would be a boon to American farmers, especially soybean producers, but a significant ripple effect could follow in the agricultural exports of other countries.

Coalition formed to keep Tomato Suspension Agreement

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s recently announced intent to withdraw from the 2013 Tomato Suspension Agreement has raised the concern of an American coalition of nearly 80 businesses and industry associations. Canada is watching closely for any unintended consequences if the pull-out goes ahead on May 7.

Film row covers benefit German asparagus growers

About 90 per cent of the asparagus acreage in Germany is covered with film. That’s because white asparagus is considered the German king of vegetables. The season kicks off in April.

U.S.- China negotiations gain traction as March 1 deadline approaches

The U.S. and China have started to outline commitments in principle on the stickiest issues in their trade dispute, marking significant progress, according to one Asia news outlet.