Vineland’s Impact Report for 10th anniversary

Ten years ago, the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre drove onto the on-ramp and has steadily moved into the fast lane. With dozens of research scientists on board in multiple disciplines, the impacts are now measureable in a new report.

 

Here are some of the successes impacting Canada’s $5.4 billion horticulture industry: 

 

  • Commercialization of the Cold Snap pear
  • 200,000 acres of Smitten apples to be planted by 2020
  • Appassimento technology to meet winemakers’ needs and consumer preferences
  • Storage recommendations for Sovereign Coronation grapes
  • Deep variant scanning, a proprietary approach to trait discovery
  • Growing and marketing advice to bring world crops to local markets
  • Research on biocontrol of thrips in greenhouse crops

 

These and other projects are explained in detail in Vineland’s Impact Report.  Go to: 

http://www.vinelandresearch.com/sites/default/files/publications/impact_report.pdf

If latest news: 
Check if it is latest news (for "Latest News" page)
Publish date: 
Friday, November 4, 2016

Click to leave a comment

CAPTCHA
For security purposes, please confirm you are not a robot!

RELATED NEWS

Kwik Lok unveils sustainable bag closure

A new Eco-Lok closure offers the same safety, quality and rigidity as former plastic closures with lower carbon footprint.

Latest technology at FutureTEC Zone

United Fresh 2019 offers a glimpse into the future with a TEC Zone featuring 24 top ag tech start-up companies. One of those is Montreal-based Motorleaf, which uses artificial intelligence to automate harvest yield estimates and disease scouting in tomato and pepper greenhouses. 

Tiny package, huge benefit for cherry growers

Hazel Technologies Inc., based in Salinas, California, has developed a small, biodegradable and food-safe insert to extend the shelf life of a carton of fresh fruit. Now the post-harvest sachet is being launched for one of the most challenging fruits to keep fresh – cherries.

Potato common scab research unveils surprising results

Scabby potatoes are unmarketable. However, molecular technology has determined that the most predominant species in Ontario might be one that could be controlled with cultural practices.

Automated agriplanter debuts on Ontario vegetable farms

Several Ontario vegetable farms are working together to trial new transplanting technology they hope will save time and labour.