Carbaryl-based pesticides re-evaluated

HEATHER LIGHT

 

Pesticides are registered under the Pest Control Products Act.  Every 15 years, pesticides are re-evaluated to determine if they continue to meet health and environmental safety standards, which could result in changes to allowed uses, treatment locations, frequency of applications and other label precautions. Carbaryl-based pesticides have recently been reevaluated. 

 

The re-evaluation decision document made by the Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency of Canada (PMRA) includes details about changes in use. See our factsheet below summarizing the carbaryl changes industry-wide. 

 

Growers may be impacted by the changes in carbaryl pesticides and their use as a result of the re-evaluation.

Heather Light is pesticide compliance officer, Pesticide Compliance Program, Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch, Health Canada.

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Publish date: 
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

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