U.S. backs down on Mexican tariffs

In high-level negotiations in Washington the week of June 3, a crisis was averted when the United States cancelled its threats to assess five per cent tariffs on Mexican goods as of June 10. 

 

“The cross-border trade community is pleased with this outcome,” said Britton Clarke, president of the Border Trade Alliance. “We know that the tariffs would have harmed our economy and would not have had their intended effect of stemming the tide of Central American asylum-seekers at the U.S. southern border. We would encourage the administration now to redouble its efforts to work with leaders on Capitol Hill to ensure the passage of the USMCA and continue to cooperate with our neighbour Mexico in confronting the challenges at our shared border.”

 

According to its website, the Border Trade Alliance wants to “preserve cross-border produce trade, resisting protectionism from regional interests.” 

 

The association -- representing more than 4.2 million public and private sector representatives -- wants to balance security, trade and travel at the borders. “Because our ports of entry are so central to our physical and economic security, we are skeptical of the efficacy of the construction of a wall along the length of the U.S-Mexico border which we believe would divert finite security resources away from the ports.”

 

Founded in 1986, the Border Trade Alliance (BTA) is a grassroots, non-profit organization that serves as a forum for participants to address key issues affecting trade, travel and security in North America. Working with entities in Canada, Mexico and the United States, the BTA advocates on behalf of policies and initiatives designed to improve border affairs and trade relations among the three nations. 

 

 

Source:  Border Trade Alliance June 7, 2019 statement

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Monday, June 10, 2019

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