Carbon tax rebate in AB

The Alberta Greenhouse Growers’ Association (AGGA) has successfully argued for a rebate on the province’s carbon tax which came into effect January 1. There will be a 80 per cent rebate on the carbon levy in a two-year program.

 

The argument was threefold. In the greenhouse environment, photosynthesis uses light energy to convert carbon dioxide and water into sugars in green plants – a net benefit for removing carbon. Secondly, the Alberta economy is strengthened when greenhouse vegetables are grown locally, almost year-round. And thirdly, the industry must be competitive with British Columbia growers who have received a rebate since 2012.

 

Alberta’s greenhouse growers bear considerable costs in lighting and heating through the winter. The industry calculated that without relief, the carbon tax would have cost an additional $5 million says Dr. Mohyuddin Mirza, AGGA consultant.

 

This is good news for the entire industry, especially greenhouse vegetable growers who manage 180 acres. Another 20 acres of expansion is planned for the province this year. 

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Publish date: 
Sunday, January 22, 2017

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