RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

RELATED NEWS

Cornell U releases three new apple varieties

Orchardists in New York state and across the U.S. will have access to three new apple varieties:  Cordera, Pink Luster and Firecracker.   

OECD reports unprecedented fall in gross domestic product

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reports a fall of 9.8% in GDP in Q2 of 2020. This is the largest drop ever recorded for the major seven economies. GDP fell most dramatically in the United Kingdom and the least in the United States. Canada’s GDP fell 12%.  

Field practices updated for California leafy greens

More than 50 recommendations have been approved by the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement to revise practices in farm water use and field/equipment sanitation. The action comes after 2019 outbreaks of E. coli-contaminated romaine lettuce. 

United Fresh Convention moves to June 2021

The United Fresh Produce Association and Fresh Produce and Floral Council will hold a joint convention and expo June 24-26, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. 

 

Syngenta Vegetable Seeds offer virtual cucurbit event

The free-to-attend online experience, September 10, aims to connect the vegetable seed industry value chain with exclusive access to Syngenta innovations and experts.

RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

RELATED NEWS

Bayer launches trials to address ToBRFV

Two varieties of Roma-type tomatoes that claim intermediate resistance to Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus will be trialled in Mexico. 

Prowl H2O herbicide label expanded for transplanted celery

Another weed control tool is available to growers of muck crops. 

Biological control to be used in potatoes, garlic

Sylvar Technologies Inc is introducing a biological control to manage common scab in potatoes and basal root rot in garlic.

Cohort Wholesale enters Canadian marketplace

A new wholesaler, headed by 20-year veteran Scott Hodgins, aims to connect farmers with crop protection manufacturers. 

Poast Ultra herbicide label extended for green onions

Growers of green onions have another option for weed control. 

RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

RELATED NEWS

The Grower wins three awards

The Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation has honoured The Grower in the categories of photography and electronic audio (podcasts) in its first-ever virtual awards.

Soil fertility specialist appointed in Ontario

Dr. Tejendra Chapagain has been hired by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs to work with horticultural farmers on cover crops and soil fertility matters. He brings global experience in Nepal and Japan to the role as well as diverse field experience in Canada. 

DRC announces leadership changes

The Fruit and Vegetable Dispute Resolution Corporation has announced that Luc Mougeot will become the new president and CEO on January 1, 2021. He will replace the retiring Fred Webber, who has held the role since 2011. 

Mike Ecker, winner of CPMA Lifetime Achievement Award

The Canadian Produce Marketing Association is honouring Mike Ecker, president of Vineland Growers’ Co-operative, for his 45-year career in the produce industry. 

OPMA welcomes two new board members

The Ontario Produce Marketing Association has two new board directors:  Fiona McLean, Del Fresco Produce and Michael Wexler, the Oppenheimer Group. They will serve a three-year term.

RELATED NEWS

Grape expectations: up and down

After 45 years of farming, it’s safe to say 2020 has been a year like no other for Ernie Wiens. Due to scant rainfall and high temperatures, grape tonnage volumes are expected to be down by 20 per cent. He’s poised to take a brix test of Chardonnay grapes, one of many varieties grown at the family’s 400 acres of vineyards near Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

How robots will give a hand to food security

The repetitive task of crop scouting in greenhouses is being replaced by an automated system with artificial intelligence which can detect pests and disease in real time. This bleeding-edge technology is not for everyone. But it’s a new consideration for Jake Neufeld who manages a labour-intensive crop of high-wire cucumbers near Leamington, Ontario. 

Green light for berry bright future

The Greenbelt Foundation has identified that vertical farming as well as several fruits and vegetables are ripe for expansion in Ontario’s $2.2 billion horticultural sector. They are garlic, eggplant, sweet potatoes, fresh grapes, pears and strawberries. Jeff Tigchelaar, Jordan, Ontario is one berry grower enjoying robust sales at the Ontario Food Terminal.

Fewer hands, less food

Last July, this display of plenty from Oxford County grower John Den Boer was captured at the Ontario Food Terminal. As the summer of COVID-19 unfolds, the variety and volume of fruits and vegetables may not be in such grand array because growers do not have timely access to enough seasonal ag workers for essential planting and harvesting. The legal case of Brett Schuyler signifies the height of the hurdles faced by growers across Canada. 

Coping with changing rules of engagement

Sour cherry trees will be in blossom in May, immune to the world pandemic of COVID-19 virus. Although an uplifting sight, the outstanding question is how they will be harvested in two months. This cover story quotes several horticultural industry leaders on what’s happening now and potential paths forward. 

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FEATURES

  • Thinley Sangpo, Fresh Taste Produce, Ontario Food Terminal. Photo by Glenn Lowson.
    The Grower wins three awards

    The Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation has honoured The Grower in the categories of photography and electronic audio (podcasts) in its first-ever virtual awards.

  • Soil fertility specialist appointed in Ontario

    Dr. Tejendra Chapagain has been hired by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs to work with horticultural farmers on cover crops and soil fertility matters. He brings global experience in Nepal and Japan to the role as well as diverse field experience in Canada. 

  • DRC announces leadership changes

    The Fruit and Vegetable Dispute Resolution Corporation has announced that Luc Mougeot will become the new president and CEO on January 1, 2021. He will replace the retiring Fred Webber, who has held the role since 2011. 

  • Mike Ecker, winner of CPMA Lifetime Achievement Award

    The Canadian Produce Marketing Association is honouring Mike Ecker, president of Vineland Growers’ Co-operative, for his 45-year career in the produce industry. 

Recent News

Weeding robot now on road trip to French vineyards

Feedback from 20 French winegrowers has helped to refine the latest version of Ted, a robotic weeder now on a roadshow throughout France. It’s available for sale in 2021.  

The Grower wins three awards

The Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation has honoured The Grower in the categories of photography and electronic audio (podcasts) in its first-ever virtual awards.

Soil fertility specialist appointed in Ontario

Dr. Tejendra Chapagain has been hired by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs to work with horticultural farmers on cover crops and soil fertility matters. He brings global experience in Nepal and Japan to the role as well as diverse field experience in Canada. 

The First Canadian Honeycrisp Apple Contest

Post your largest Honeycrisp photo on Twitter AND email to The Grower in the First Canadian Honeycrisp Apple Contest. Provincial winners will be announced in the November 2020 issue.

Return of The Royal

An online version of the Country-Meets-City event will run November 10-14.

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Bill studied horticulture at the University ...
Chris Duyvelshoff, is OFVGA's crop protection ...
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