BC Tree Fruits predict record cherry crop for 2016

As summer grows closer, so does the abundance of summer fruit from the orchards of BC Tree Fruits Cooperative (BC Tree Fruits) growers. For the second consecutive year, an early and warm spring will result in cherries in stores by early June.
    

With a record 12 million pounds estimated for this season, that figure is up substantially from the 10.5 million pounds from 2015. For the rest of the summer fruit coming from Okanagan orchards, BC Tree Fruits is estimating an increase in tonnage of approximately 20-25 per cent across other commodities. 
    

“Mother Nature has provided our growers with very warm spring days leading up to bloom resulting in another early start to the summer fruit season this year,” says BC Tree Fruits marketing manager Chris Pollock. “We expect to start harvesting early-season varieties of cherries in early June, with the fruit hitting retail shelves very soon after.” 
    

The primary market for cherries remains western Canada and the United States. The remainder is marketed and sold to key off-shore markets through the partnership with Sutherland S.A. Produce Inc. 
    

BC Tree Fruits Cooperative is comprised of more than 500 local grower families who grow a variety of tree fruit commodities including apples, cherries, pears, peaches, nectarines, apricots, prunes, plums and grapes. BC Tree Fruits head office is located in Kelowna, BC.

Source:  BC Tree Fruits news release  

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Publish date: 
Thursday, May 26, 2016

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