Smooth transition expected of major fruit tree nursery to Upper Canada Growers

Robert Haynes, president of Upper Canada Growers, examines apple rootstocks. Photo by Glenn Lowson.

Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON -- Upper Canada Growers sounds like a company enshrined in history. It is, sort of.  Just months old, this is the new brand of a company that’s been around for 40 years. The Haynes family has fruit growing expertise in utilizing rootstock from multiple sources to bud and graft a wide variety of fruit varieties onto them.  
    

The former general manager of Mori Essex Nurseries, Robert Haynes and his twin progeny, Jason and Megan, have created a company with the goal of producing affordable fruit trees to Canadian farmers. “It’s important to have a stable source of fruit trees for an industry that’s seeing a positive uptrend,” said Robert Haynes at a recent open house.
    

The company is rapidly becoming well-known as one of the country’s major developers of fruit trees for Canadian farmers.
    

Haynes also underlines that new propagation techniques such as tissue culture are helping to produce well-rooted trees within a year. Tissue-cultured rootstocks have a very low mortality rate and are the most resistant to diseases affecting fruit trees.     
    

A $2.50 per tree deposit will be required for a minimum 1,000-tree order. Growers are encouraged to place orders for 2018 and 2019.  Some apple varieties are available for 2017.  For more information, visit www.uppercanadagrowers.ca

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Publish date: 
Thursday, October 20, 2016

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