RELATED NEWS

Carbon taxed

If change is not practical, then it is not sustainable.

Smooth transition expected of major fruit tree nursery to Upper Canada Growers

Upper Canada Growers sounds like a company enshrined in history. It is, sort of.

Remembrance Day is just around the corner, and in addition to remembering those who have fallen, I received a ‘message’ at Thanksgiving that is worth passing along.

RELATED NEWS

Carbon taxed

If change is not practical, then it is not sustainable.

Smooth transition expected of major fruit tree nursery to Upper Canada Growers

Upper Canada Growers sounds like a company enshrined in history. It is, sort of.

RELATED NEWS

Carbon taxed

If change is not practical, then it is not sustainable.

Smooth transition expected of major fruit tree nursery to Upper Canada Growers

Upper Canada Growers sounds like a company enshrined in history. It is, sort of.

RELATED NEWS

Carbon taxed

If change is not practical, then it is not sustainable.

Smooth transition expected of major fruit tree nursery to Upper Canada Growers

Upper Canada Growers sounds like a company enshrined in history. It is, sort of.

RELATED NEWS

Virus testing to get faster

Before any new tree fruit varieties can be accepted in Canada, they must pass virus testing in a quarantine setting in Sidney, British Columbia. Thanks to new research funding, DNA technology may streamline the process from three years to six months.

Carbon taxed

If change is not practical, then it is not sustainable.

Climate change appears in every article these days about farming and the environment, yet few say much that is useful to growers to either understand or adapt to the impacts of climate change.

With Thanksgiving, Ontario Agriculture Week and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement still fresh in our minds, it’s a great time to reflect on one of agriculture’s most pressing imperatives: that is, tearing down fences between – and within -- urban and rural Canada.

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FEATURES

  • Andrew Dornan, agronomic development manager, horticulture for Bayer CropScience, is pictured at a 2017 Ontario field day. 
    Bayer’s pipeline

    New products, relevant to horticulture, are in the pipeline for 2018 and beyond.

  • Brown rot on peach (L) and nectarine.
     Rovral registered

    The registration of Rovral WP for nectarines adds another fungicide in the arsenal to prevent resistance.

  • ​Celery leaf curl
    Fungicide for celery leaf curl 

    The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of an URMULE registration for Switch fungicide for control of anthracnose (leaf curl) on celery in Canada. Switch fungicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of several diseases.

  • Bacterial leaf spot on lettuce
    Bacterial leaf spot

    The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of an URMULE registration for Confine Extra fungicide for suppression of bacterial leaf spot (Xanthomonos campestris pv vitians) in Canada. Confine Extra fungicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for several different diseases.

  • Anju Gill, executive director, BC Blueberry Council
    Anju Gill leads BC Blueberry Council

    The BC Blueberry Council is looking to the future with its appointment of Anju Gill as executive director.

  •  Trucks wait to be weighed at the Sun-Brite plant for processing tomatoes, Leamington, ON.  Photo by Glenn Lowson
    New OPVG directors 

    A newly constituted board of directors meets for the first time to chart the course for Ontario’s $100 million processing vegetable industry.

  • Guelph names new associate vice-president of research

    The University of Guelph has appointed a new associate vice-president research (agri-food partnership). Prof. Beverley Hale has been appointed to the role effective Jan. 1, 2018 for a five-year term.

  • The November 2016 cover story in The Grower earned a gold award in the news photograph category of the annual awards of the Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation.
    The Grower wins awards

    The Grower, with a track record of 138 years as a horticultural publication, is never too old for awards. We’re proud to share the back stories of two awards from the Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation. 

Recent News

Loblaw to offer home delivery

Canada’s biggest grocer offers home delivery in the two biggest urban centres. Loblaw also announces the closure of 22 stores in a rapidly changing marketplace.

More ginseng to Asia

Ontario’s ginseng industry generates $239 million in sales, mostly to Asia. New federal funding will boost opportunities to grow the industry. 

Major spike in cost of doing business

Moody skies over a field of fall vegetables echo the frame of mind of Ontario’s growers, as they face a minimum wage increase to $14/hour as of January 1. 

Real dirt on farming

Farm & Food Care Ontario released it fourth edition of The Real Dirt on Farming magazine earlier this month. Starting on page 20-23 the publication covers fruit and vegetable crops providing farmer profiles, did you know facts and more.

Soil health consultation

The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), an Ontario government ministry released a draft of a provincial soil health strategy. Farmers and industry stakeholders are encouraged to provide feedback before December 31, 2017. 

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OUR COLUMNISTS

Jan VanderHout is a greenhouse vegetable ...
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